LIVE Comets Index

There are thousands of Comets buzzing in and around our solar system, and they’re just the ones we know about. At LIVE Comet Data, you’ll find data on the more notable and interesting comets.

Below is a list of Comets that are currently in our database and the reason why they are significant. If you’d like to see LIVE data for a comet that is not listed below, why not send us a request by email.

Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko (67P)

Comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko

Comet 67P will continue to be the focus of the ‘Rosetta Mission’ until December 2015. Rosetta arrived alongside Comet 67P in August 2014 where it then deployed a lander (Philae) to the comet’s surface. Due to the lack of sunlight at the landing site, Philae lost all power, but there is still hope that it may come back online.

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Comet Lovejoy (C/2014 Q2)

Comet Lovejoy C/2014 Q2 by Damian Peach

This long-period comet became visible in the Northern Hemisphere (through typical backyard telescopes) in late December. As it continued to move northwards in January, it increased in brightness and was visible with just binoculars. Although fading, it is still one of the brightest comets and is visible with a telescope.

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Comet Siding Spring (C/2013 A1)

Comet Siding Spring

Discovered in January of last year, it was quickly established that Comet Siding Spring was going to pass incredibly close to Mars. At 18:27 UTC on October 19th, Comet Siding Spring zoomed by at just 84,500 miles (141,000km) above the red planets surface.

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Comet Jacques (C/2014 E2)

Comet Jacques

Discovered in March last year, Comet Jacques (C/2014 E2) was predicted to be one of the brighter comets of 2014. Although, still fairly faint, Comet Jacques reached a magnitude of +5.66 in August and was visible with just a keen eye and a decent pair of binoculars.

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Comet LINEAR (209P) Comet 209P (LINEAR) will pass Earth at just 8,296,593 kilometres (5.16 million miles) in May of this year. It is expected that this close approach will result in debris from the comet being strewn in the path of Earth’s orbit likely causing a meteor shower on May 23rd/24th. Comet 209P will not be a naked eye object as it is only expected to reach magnitude +10.

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Comet ISON (C/2012 S1)

Comet ISON - Damian Peach (used with permission).

Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) was widely publicised to become a very bright object in our December 2013 skies. Unfortunately, during perihelion, Comet ISON fizzled. As we don’t know how much (if any) of ISON survived, this data is now purely for interest purposes.

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Comet LINEAR (C/2012 X1)

Comet LINEAR (C/2012 X1)

Comet LINEAR (C/2012 X1) was discovered on December 8th 2012. However, it wasn’t until October 2013 that it really caught astronomers’ attention, when suddenly LINEAR brightened by about 5 magnitudes.

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Comet Lovejoy (C/2013 R1)

Comet Lovejoy. Image by Damian Peach.

Comet Lovejoy (C/2013 R1) was discovered on September 7th 2013. It reached a peak brightness of magnitude 4.5 on 19th November 2013. Its perihelion date was 22 December 2013.

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Comet Oukaimeden (C/2013 V5) Info coming soon…

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Halley’s Comet (1P) Halley’s Comet is the most famous comet of them all appearing once every 75-76 years. It’s next visit to the inner Solar System will be mid 2061.

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Comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1) Info coming soon…

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